Tuesday, January 19, 2021

World’s Greatest Filling for Just About Everything

 

 

Here, finally, is the recipe from Yiddishland .

One of you called it "the world's greatest filling for just about anything," and that is just about it.

World’s Greatest Filling for Just About Everything

Olive oil (be liberal)

1 small onion

1 small carrot

1 stalk celery

1pound fresh mushrooms

½ ounce dried mushrooms, soaked in hot water

 

(You may add all or just some of the following six ingredients)

1 tablespoon chia seeds, soaked in 3 tablespoons water

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

2 tablespoons hemp seeds, lightly toasted (be careful, they can easily burn)

¼ cup sunflower seeds, lightly toasted, ground or whole

¼ cup pumpkin seeds, lightly toasted and crushed, ground, or chopped)

¼ cup pine nuts, ground or whole

Salt, pepper, and paprika to taste

 

(½-1½   cup cooked brown rice, white rice, or barley, if desired)

 

Dice the onion, carrot, and celery into little ¼-inch cubes, or something close to that.  Warm a liberal amount of olive oil in a large pan (I used a 12-inch cast iron skillet).  Add the diced aromatics and stir and fry for about 15 minutes until golden.  Meanwhile dice or process the fresh mushrooms.  Drain the dried mushrooms, reserving the liquid for the sauce, and dice.  Add the diced mushrooms and continue cooking.  They will give off a lot of liquid.  Cook until the liquid is almost completely absorbed.  Season with salt and pepper.

Add all or some of the seeds listed above.  The soaked chia seeds provide a matrix to hold everything together, the toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds amplify the savory flavor of the mushrooms, sesame and pine nuts are just plain delicious, and the hemp seeds lend themselves to all kinds of vegan applications.  Stir everything up and taste for seasoning.  Now, if you are going to use this filling for pasta or pastry like knishes, pierogi, varenishkes, or strudel, you are all set.  If you are going to use it to stuff cabbage leaves, or a pumpkin or squashes, or eggplant, or kohlrabi, you might want to add the cooked grain. This recipe makes enough for you to do both.

 




 

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

װעגאַנער בלינצעס Vegan Blintses


 



 

די־אָ בלינצעס, און אויך אַ גאַנצן געפּרעגל פֿון קלאַסישע בלינצעס (ד"ה בלינצעס מדאורײַתא) האָבן מיר געמאַכט אין  אונדזער זומיש קאָכ־װאַרשטאַט אין ייִדיש ניו־יאָרק.  געװײנטלעך װאָלטן מיר אַלע פֿאַרזוכט אַ ביסל, אָבער דאָס יאָר מוזן פֿישל און איך אַלײן אויפֿעסן אַלע בלינצעס.  בלינצעס האָבן מער געגעסן אויפֿן צװײטן פֿרישטיק, װאַרעמעס, און אויף דעזערט, און בלינצעס װערן אונדז נאָך נישט נימאַס. 

 

We made these blintzes, and an entire batch of classic blintzes (blintzes according to Hoyle) in our Yiddish New York workshop.  Normally everyone would have had a little taste, but these are not normal times, and El Choclo and I have been eating blintzes at every meal. We are not tired of them yet.

 

װעגאַנישע בלינטסעס

 

 

די בלעטער

 

3 אָנצן באַגרײטע־מעל (אָדער מעל מיט באַקפּראָשעק)

½ לעפֿל פּאַפּשוי־קראָכמאַל

1/2 לעפֿעלע זאַלץ

½ טעפּל סאָיאַ־מילך

½ טעפּל װאַסער

2 לעפֿל בוימל (זונרויז־בוימל, אפֿשר)

1־2 לעפֿל אָפּגעקאָכטע קירבעס אָדער קאַבאַק

 

שלאָגט'ץ אַדורך דאָס מעל מיטן קאראָכמאַל.  מישט אויס אַלע אינגרעדיענטן.

װאַרעמט'ץ אָן אַ גאָס־אײַזן פֿענדל (סקאָװראָדע) און באַשמירט'ץ זי מיט אַ ביסל בוימל. פּרעגלט'ץ אָפּ די בלעטער אויף אײַן זײַט.

 

 

דאָס געפֿילעכץ

 

װעגאַנישע צװאָרעך:

4 טעפּלעך סאָיאַ־מילך

זאַפֿט פֿון ½ לימענע

 

קאָכט'ץ די מילך זי זאָל גוט שפּרודלען. לעשט'ץ אויס און גיסט'ץ אַרײַן לימענע זאַפֿט. מישט'ץ אַ ביסל און לאָז אָפּקילן אַ צען מינוט. זיפּט'ץ דורך זיפּעלע מיט אַ בלעטל קעז־זעקל.

 

קאַשו־נוס צװאָרעך

 

½ טעפּל קאַשו־ניס אײַנגעװײקט אַ מעת־לעת אין װאַסער

1 לעפֿעלע זאַלץ

1 לעפֿל צוקער

2 לעפֿל בוימל

(אויב מע װיל, אַ לעפֿל קאַבאַק)

 

גיסט'ץ אָפּ דאָס װאַסער פֿון די קאַשו־ניס און מאָלט'ץ זײ אָפּ אינעם מאַשינדל מיט אַלע אינגרעדיענטן.

 

לײגט'ץ די בלעטער אויף אַ טעלער מיט דער אָפּגעפּרעגלטער זײַט אַרויף. פֿילט זײ אײַן און פּרעגלט זײ שײן אָפּ.

 

 

Vegan Blintzes

 

The Crepes

 

3 ounces (3/4 cup) self-rising flour

½ tablespoon cornstarch

½ teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons oil

1 tablespoon cooked mashed squash

½ cup soymilk

½ cup water

 

Sift the flour with the cornstarch and blend in the other ingredients.  Warm a cast-iron griddle and brush with oil.  Fry the crepes on one side only until the upper surface appears dry.  Allow them to cool while you prepare the filling

 

The Filling

 

4 cups soymilk

Juice of ½ lemon

 

Bring the soymilk to a vigorous boil.  Lower the heat and pour in the lemon juice (about 2 tablespoons) draw a spoon through the milk as the curds form.  Allow it to cool for a few minutes while you grind the cashews:

 

½ cup cashews soaked overnight in water

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons oil

If desired, a tablespoon cooked squash

 

Pour off the water and grind up the cashews in a processor.  Add the remaining ingredients and blend.  Strain the soy whey through a cheese cloth. Fold the cashew mixture into the soy curds. 

Lay the crepes fried-side-up on a plate and fill with the cheese.  Roll them up and fry until golden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 




 

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Pumpkin Pappardelle


 

 

I have been thinking of these noodles since at least 2012, when I made this delicious pumpkin seed sauce, and thought, what this sauce wants is some pumpkin pasta.  I made pappardelle because they are pretty easy to make by hand, and also because I just like saying "pumpkin pappardelle." I was also wondering if I could reproduce the success I had with these vegan buns and this vegan challah in making egg-free egg noodles with pumpkin pulp.  These noodles are very toothy and satisfying. Well, they are noodles.

Pumpkin Pappardelle

2 cups (8 ounces) flour

1/2 cup mashed or pureed cooked pumpkin or squash

1/4 cup (possibly more) olive oil

1/4 cup water, possibly more depending on the liquid content of your pumpkin

Pile the flour onto a countertop or into a shallow bowl.  Make a well in the center and put in the pumpkin, oil, and water.


Use a fork or your fingers to draw the flour into the pumpkin to form a dough.  It is really perfectly acceptable to use a food processor to make pasta dough.  Allow your dough to rest a while and roll it out to a thin leaf between 1/8 and 1/16 inch thick.


Roll up the sheet of pasta dough and cut 3/4 in wide for pappardelle or 3/8 inch wide for tagliatelle or fettucine.  Dry the pasta on a rack or make a rack by balancing your rolling pin on two jars of honey.  It can also just rest on the counter top.

Cook the Pappardelle in liberally salted water until done to your taste, and serve with sauce.  Brown butter and sage is good, and of course, I recommend enthusiastically this pumpkin seed sauce 



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Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Flumpkin פֿלאַבאַק

יאָ, אונדז'אָמער ליב פֿלאַן, און יאָ, אאונדז'אָמער ליב קאַראַמעל, און יאָ, אונדז'אָמער אָן־אַ־שיעור קאַבאַק, אָבער נישט דאָס בין איך אויסן. אויסן בין איך אַז ס'פֿעלט אונדז פֿלאַבאַק, און פֿלאַבאַק גײט זיך אַלײן נישט מאַכן. דער פֿלאַבאַק איז זײַדן־זיס און פּאַרפֿומירט נאָר מיט קאַבאַק און װאַניל. אויב עץ װיט'ץ צוגעבן צימערינג און אַנדערע געװירצן איז מהיכא־תּיתי, נאָר טו אַ פּרוװ װי ער שטײט און גײט. קאַבאַק האָט אַ טעם. זאָל לעבן קאַבאַק 

 

Yes, we love flan, and we love caramel, and yes we have lots of pumpkin, but that's not the point. The point is that the world needs flumpkin, and it isn't going to make itself. This flumpkin is satin sweet and perfumed only with pumpkin and a little vanilla. I will you to add some cinnamon and other spices if you really like, but try it as is. Pumpkin has a flavor. Let pumpkin be pumpkin.  

Flumpkin 

For the Caramel 

3/4 cups (150 g) sugar 

juice of one lemon 

Have ready two nine-inch pyrex pie pans or about eight individual ramekins. Place the sugar in a small saucepan and squeeze the lemon juice onto the sugar. Mix the juice with the sugar to the texture of wet sand. Place the pan over medium heat and allow the sugar to melt without stirring until caramel-colored, about five minutes. Refraining from stirring is the only hard part of this recipe. When the caramel is melted and close to the desired color lift the pot off the heat and yes, now you may give it a swirl, but only a swirl. Quickly pour the hot caramel into the pans or ramekins. Place the pans or ramekins in a larger baking dish.

For the Flumpkin 

1 cup milk 

1 cup cream 

2/3 cup (6 ounces) cooked mashed or pureed pumpkin or squash 

3/4 cups sugar 

2 teaspoons vanilla 

5 eggs 

Warm the oven to 325 F. Bring a kettle of water to the boil. Combine the milk, cream, pumpkin, and sugar in a sauce pan and bring to a simmer, whisking together. Remove from heat and add vanilla.  whisk the eggs in a largish bowl.  When the cream has cooled slightly, whisk it into the eggs. Strain and pour onto the caramel-coated pans. Place the baking pan containing the flan-pans in the oven and pour the hot water into the larger pan so the flumpkin bakes in a hot bath. Bake for about one hour.It will still seem a little jiggly when you take it out.

Remove the Flumpkin from the oven and allow to cool or chill. Unmold onto a flat plate.

 

 מהיכא־תּיתי If you wish

 װי ער שטײט און גײט as is

Yiddish pumpkin vocabulary is here

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Friday, September 18, 2020

Sunny Honey Bunny Cake and Honey Cake Round-up

These sweet juicy carrots came this week, just in time for honey cake baking.  I had been planning to make a sunny honey cake with whole and ground sunflower seeds, so it seemed providential that it should become a sunny bunny honey cake with the addition of carrots.




I already made this vegan honey cake, so I was planning to make this cake with eggs, but the sunflower seeds and soymilk provided all the richness and structure the cake needed, and I just didn't add the eggs after all and there it is.


I recall once hearing a radio interview with the great Mel Blanc, who provided the voices for Bugs Bunny and almost all the other Looney Tunes characters.  Blanc was an amazingly gifted voice actor who could make almost any sound. The one sound he could not make was the sound of a crunching carrot, so in every single performance over the course of his decades-long career as Bugs, he had to eat actual carrots while doing the dialogue.  Oh, did he get tired of carrots. He tried crunching apples, crackers, every crunchy food they could provide, but nothing made a sound sufficiently carrot-like to suit the master's standards.  Thus did he suffer for his art.


Sunny  Bunny Honey Cake

7 ounces (1 1/2 cups) sunflower seeds
24 ounces all purpose flour (You may use part whole wheat flour)

2 cups sugar  (half or all brown)

2 tablespoos baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons cinnamon

1 teaspoon ginger


2 oranges

1 lemon
15 ounces (1 1/2 cups) bamboo honey

1 1/2 cup soy milk or other milk
12 ounces sunflower oil (or 1 12.7 ounce bottle) Any sunflower oil is fine, but if you can get this wonderful buttery, nutty unrefined sunflower oil you will be glad you did.

7 medium carrots 18 ounces after peeling  (4 cups) 

Additional raw sunflower seeds for topping


Heat oven to 400 F. 

Prepare 3 medium ring-shaped cake pans (the vegan batter produces a lower volume)

Toast the sunflower seeds, and grind them up in a processor or mortar.

Wash, peel and grind or grate the carrots,

Sift together the dry ingredients.  Whisk in the toasted sunflower meal. 

Cut the oranges and lemon into pieces

Blend the citrus bits in a blender with 1/2 cup of the soymilk,  add the honey and vanilla. With the blender running, drizzle in the oil. If you want eggs, replace the last cup of soymilk with 4 eggs.  otherwise, pour the honey-oil sauce onto the dry ingredients, and blend the remaining cup of soymilk in the blender to free up all the delicious bits clinging to the sides. Mix the batter gently and fold in the carrots.  Pour into baking pans and sprinkle raw sunflower seeds on top.

Bake 10 minutes at 400, 20 minutes at 375, 25 minutes at 350, and leave in the turned-off hot oven for another 15 minutes.  (Egg-free baking takes longer.  Smaller pans might have been good)

Classic Honey Cake

Universal Honey Cake

Michigan Star Thistle Honey Cake

Chocolate Honey Cake

Pomegranate Mahlab Honey Cake

Date Honey Cake

Honey pudding

Honey Pie!   

Chayale Palevski's Honey Teygelekh and Ingberlekh 






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Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Chard or Spinach Cutlets and Rosheshone Silka Round-up (Rosh Ha-Shanah)


Five foods are recommended in the Gemore (Talmud Bavli Horayos 12A and Kerises 6A) for the Eve of Rosheshone.  They are silka סילקא ( בוריק־בלעטער beet greens or chard), kra קרא ( קירבעס zucchini or squash),  rubia רוביא (   לוביע, שװאַרץ־אײגעלע black-eyed peas), karsi כּרתי ( פּאָרעס leeks) and tamri תּמרי ( טײַטלען dates).  This recipe is for chard or beet greens, and can be adapted for any leafy greens.  These are lovely on their own, but I imagine they would have no objections to a yellow tomato sauce, or any tomato sauce, a cream sauce, or a horseradish sauce.


Vegan Chard or Spinach Cutlets

For the cutlets:

2 bunches (about 1 pound) spinach, beet greens,  or chard

1 tablespoon olive oil (or other oil)

1 tablespoon Chickpea flour of fava garbanzo flour 

salt, pepper, paprika

oil for frying 

For the batter:

1/2 cup  tablespoons (56 grams) sifted chickpea flour or fava garbanzo flour

1/8 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

optional: 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, paprika, and/or cumin


Remove the stems, wash the greens well and cook them in the water clinging to the leaves.  Allow them to cool and squeeze out as much water as you can. Chop the greens fine or pulse in a processor.  You should have 1 cup (6 ounces, 170 grams) chopped greens.

In a bowl, mix the chopped greens with 1 tablespoon chickpea flour and seasonings.  Form the mixture into pancakes with your hands.

Heat oil in a wide skillet.

Combine the chickpea flour with the salt, baking powder and optional seasonings, if using.  Whisk in enough cold water (about 1/2 cup) to make a thin batter.

Dip the cutlets in the batter and fry on both sides until golden.

 

This recipe is a vegan, gluten-free adaptation of Fania Lewando's Spinach Cutlets.


Other Silka recipes for the New Year:

Dill and Chard Frittata

Fedelini with Walnuts, Chard, and Garlic Scapes

Braised Chard Stems with Oregano and Chile

White Bean Soup with Chard Stems

Pokey Leek Soup (this recipe has 3 simonim)

Spinach with Pumpkin Seeds

Green Rice

Beet Greens Soup and Beet Soup

 

Rosheshone Vocabulary from the League for Yiddish part I

Rosheshone Vocabulary from The League for Yiddish part II


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Wednesday, September 09, 2020

The Jewish Holidays are WHEN?

 


עץ װעט מיר שטאַרק אויספֿעלן דאָס יאָר צוליב גאָר אַ סך סיבות. מיר האָבן דעם שוין אַרומגעשמועסט אויף פֿאַרשידענע דיגיטאַלישע פּלאַטפֿאָרמעס.  אונדז'עמער אײנזאַם, מיט צעבראָכענע הערצער, אונדז גלוסט זיך מיר זאָלן קענען זיך באַרויקן אַז אונדז'עמער רײנגעװאַשן און ליכטיק און ציכטיק  פֿון אַלדאָס בײז; אײן זאַך, אָבער, האָט מע נאָך נישט דערמאָנט: אַלע יאָר באַמערקן מיר װי די יום־טובֿים פֿאַרשפּעטיקן זיך, אָדער קומען פֿאַר דער צײַט.  דאָס יאָר האָר און נעגל שטעלן זיך קאַפּויער־־קומען זײ פּונקט צו דער צײַט. זינט פֿאַר אַ יאָרן ראשהשנה־צײַט האָב איך אַרויסגעקוקט מיר זאָלן זיך צונויפֿקלײַבן אין שיל און טרײַבן קאַטאָװעס װעגן װי די יום־טובֿים קומען  צו דער צײַט, און אַפֿילו דאָס טאָר מען נישט     

There are many reasons I will miss gathering with all of you this year for the Holy Days.  Most of these have already been discussed on multiple platforms:  we are lonely, our hearts are breaking, we want reassure one another in person that we are washed and shriven of all ill will; but I don't think anyone has mentioned one other thing.  Every year we remark that the Jewish holidays are late, or that they are early.  This year, oh my stars and garters, they are right on time.  Ever since last Rosheshone, I have been looking forward to seeing folks at services and talking about how the holidays are on time this year and now we can't even do that.


האָר און נעגל שטעלן זיך קאַפּויער  

Hor un negl shteln zikh kapoyer! Oh my stars and garters!  I'll be bound! Whod'a thunk it?

 

 Fania Lewando's Rice with Apples and Honey



Tsimes

 

Honey Cake


 

Chayale Paelvski's Teygelekh and Ingberlekh


 



Thursday, September 03, 2020

Honey Cake for Everybody אַלגעמײנער לקח

 


I am anticipating your question.  If this is a honey cake, where's the honey? The honey is in the dates.  Many of the scriptural references to the honey flowing through the Land of Israel are not to bee honey at all but to the lush syrup exuded by the dates.  I did not set out to make a vegan, wheat-free honey cake, but it was inspired when I bought several young coconuts for the juice and needed to do something with the pulp and my beautiful neighbor gave me a box of succulent dates from the Holy Land (These fabulous vegan brownies were inspired by the same windfall).  You can probably make this with any kind of dates, just re-hydrate them a little if they are very dry.

If you have not yet tried green coconuts, or young coconuts, you might just love them. The flavor is very mild, so if you do not care for the flavor of mature coconuts, they will be your cup of tea.  The pulp is soft and jelly-like, making them a natural for vegan baking. 


Universal Honey Cake

12 Medjool Dates (about one cup, 8 ounces)
2 ounces raw almonds
4 ounces raw walnuts (about one cup)
4 ounces cocoa butter (about one cup depending on how coarsely it is chopped.
Pulp from 2 young coconuts (about one cup, 8 ounces)
2 ounces almond flour

(optional: 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/8 teaspoon ginger, 1/8 teaspoon allspice, 1/8 teaspoon cloves) 

1/2 cup toasted pecans for garnish, or leave them raw to make this an all-raw dessert. 


Remove the pits from the dates.  Place almonds and walnuts in a processor and pulse to a powder.  Add  the remaining ingredients except the pecans and grind to combine.  Pat the batter into a nine-inch pie plate and arrange the pecan halves on top.  Chill to set.


 

 

 

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Tuesday, April 14, 2020

The Chocolate Lady’s 2020 Vegetarian Peysekh Survival Guide


"Preparedness" A common theme in the Yiddish press in 1916.  Frequently Uncle Sam and doughboys are seen taking up arms against the enemy.  Here Jewish women and girls arm themselves against khomets.

Oh, my beautiful ones, how do I even send a document with the word "survival" in it? Survive.  Make whatever you want.  When I started this guide in 1995, it was my intention to share ideas for meals my friends would be able to make easily with minimal ingredients and equipment, but somehow over the intervening years, as my experience and batterie de cuisine have grown, it got to the point where I was telling you to make corn-free cornflakes with plantain flour. Now folks who have never baked a potato find themselves staring into the bumpy, russet abyss.  Take my hand.

How to Bake a Potato

Potatoes

Scrub potatoes thoroughly.  If you wish, you may coat them lightly with butter or oil.  Place in an oven heated to 450F.  If you have something in the oven baking at 400F or even 350F that is fine.   Bake for an hour or slightly longer.
You need not pierce the potato, and you may not wrap it in aluminum foil (all right, just this year, because of extraordinary  circumstances I will allow you to wrap your potatoes, I will even allow you not to peel your asparagus, just don't get used to it). 



Here is my recipe for Unplugged Ajvar, and links to sixteen fabulous recipe videos.
Here is the delicious Melitsana Matzo Pita that has been the star of the final nights of Peysekh Chez Chocolat for many years.

Here in the most wonderful vegan spinach thing ever.


Some valuable paraliturgy has emerged.  I have found these helpful.

Tkhine for a plague from 1916

Prayer to stop the plague in Bombay 1896. Deliverance was brought by Dr. Waldemar Mordecai Hafkine.

Minimalist guide to Passover  

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Wednesday, April 08, 2020

סאַלאַט פֿון פֿעפֿערס און פּאַטלעזשאַנעס Unplugged Ajvar (Peppers and Eggplant)


Like many of you, I had ajvar for the first time at the Golden Festival I had been thinking for many years that ajvar would be an ideal companion for matzo if I ever made it myself.  This year, for our Simple Yiddish with Elena class here at UM, I finally did.  Most recipes will call for blending the ingredients in a processor, but I have none here, so I pounded them in a molcajete, and the results are pretty wonderful.


Unplugged Ajvar

1 medium eggplant
3-5 large red peppers (so that you have about twice as much pepper pulp as eggplant pulp)
3-7 garlic cloves (optional)
1 ancho chile or other chile (optional)
salt
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon wine vinegar or other vinegar

Broil the Eggplants and peppers as if preparing Melitsano Matzo Pita.  Peel the vegetables and chop fine. 
If using an ancho, toast it until puffed, and remove the stem and seeds. Tear into small pieces, place the pieces in a bowl and cover with boiling water.
Peel the garlic cloves, if using, and pound them in the mortar with a little salt (Or blend in the machine of your choice).  Drain the ancho, if using, and pound or blend with the garlic.  Add the eggplant and peppers, and blend or pound well.  Add vinegar and oil and adjust seasoning to taste.

Now you can use the ajvar as is, but it is even better if you transfer it to a saucepan and simmer for about half an hour on low heat to concentrate the flavors.


Rukhl and I have made a lots of things that would be quite at home spread onto a little matzo, and not half bad with raw celery, carrots, pepper strips, radish or turnip slices.
You will never tire of matzo as long as you have  . . .

Shifra Lehrer's zt"l's vegetarian chopped liver:



Romanian Eggplant (with raw onions)



Armenian Eggplant (with caramelized onions)



Drink Tea!  Tea and psalms can't hurt.



Almond Chremslekh:  I say in this video that Chremslekh are mentioned by Rashi.  That is incorrect.  It was Rabbeinu Tam.



Cheese Latkes with Cranberry Syrup



Two kinds of Tsimes CW: meat



Matzo Braa and Spinach Fritatta

In this episode Ruklhl and I ponder the eternal question, are we thinking more about the holiday treats that we do get to eat, or all the khomets that we must do without?



A Tour of Yiddish Farm
White Beets and Spinach.  We did not intentionally make this episode for Peysekh, but it is Peysekhdik.



Borsht!  We make our year-round borsht with caraway, but just leave it out during Peysekh.  We also add lemon, which according to some traditions is just as problematic, because the Satmarer hoyf was once thrown into a panic by lemon seeds in the borsht.  The lesson is that traditional recipes must never be changed.



Shtshav (Schav) and Khremslekh



Gluten-Free Nut Kneydlekh (Matzo-Free Matzo Balls)
CW: Chicken Soup



Vegetarian Gefilte Fish



Non-Vegetarian Gefilte Fish
CW: Fish



I think you can easily adapt the cheesecake for Peysekh



Friday, March 20, 2020

Eggplant Matzo Pie מצה־געבעקס מיט פּאַטלעזשאַנעס μελιτζάνα-μαζω πίτα



שוין 15 יאָר מאַך איך דעם מצה־געבעקס אַלע פּסח.  ער לענט זיך אונטער דאָס האַרץ  


מצה געבעקס מיט פּאַטלעזשאַנעס

2 גרויסע פּאַטלעזשאַנעס
2 מצות
2 אײער
¼ טעפּל זונרויז־סעמישקע בוימל
8 אָנצן פֿעטאַ
8 אָנצן קאַסערי, אָדער קאַשקאַװאַל, אָדער עמאָנטאַל
זאַלץ, פֿעפֿער, און פּאַפּריקע לויט ענקער געשמאַק


בראָט אָפּ די פּאַטלעזשאַנעס אין בראָטאויװן אָדער אויף אַן אָפֿענעם פֿלאַם.  װענ זײ װערן קיל גענוג, שײלט זײ אָפּ. צעהאַקט זײ אויף פּיצלעך.  
װײקט אײַן די מצות אין װאַסער זײ זאָלן װערן װײך און קװעטשט אויס דאָס װאַסער.
מישט אויס צעהאַקטע פּאַטלעזשאַנעס, מצות, אײער, פֿעטאַ, און אַ ביסל בוימל און קאַסערי.  גיט צו זאַלץ, פֿעפֿער, און פּאַפּריקע לויט ענקער געשמאַק. 

לײגט אַרײַן אין אַ בעקעלע און באַשיט מיט דער איבערגעבליבענער קעז און באַגיסט מיט בוימל.  באַקט אָפּ אויף 350 אַ 40 מינוט




I have been making this every Peysekh for about 15 years.  It is very warming and comforting

μελιτζάνα-μαζω πίτα  
Eggplant Matzo Pie

2 large eggplants
2 matzos
2 eggs
1/4 cup olive oil
8 generous ounces feta
8 scant ounces kasseri, or kashkaval, or emmenthal, or something melty.
salt, pepper, and paprika to taste

Broil the eggplants under the broiler or roast them over the fire.  If you have a grilling chimney set-up or something like that, even better.  
Soak the matzos in warm water until quite soft.  Drain the matzos and squeeze out the water.  
When the eggplants are cook enough to handle, peel off the charred skin with you immaculately clean fingers.  Chop the pulp.
Combine crumbled matzos, chopped eggplant, crumbled feta, two beaten eggs, and most of the oil and kasseri.  Add salt, pepper, and paprika to taste.
Transfer to an oiled baking dish and sprinkle remaining cheese on top.  Drizzle with remaining oil.
Bake at 350F for about 40 minutes, or until top is crisp and golden.


זיך אונטערלענען דאָס האַרץ
to be warming and comforting

דער פּאַטלעזשאַנ(עס)
eggplant

אָפּבראָטן
to broil

אײַנװײקן
to soak

אָט האָט עט'ץ צװײ פּרימיטיװע פֿילמען פֿונעם רעצעפּט
Here are two primitive videos of the recipe.

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Monday, December 02, 2019

Vegan Hamburger Buns for Adam Schiff




This year I made no pies, no cornbread, no beans, no pumpkins.  I spent the entire holiday making batch after batch of buns for a project to be announced shortly.

The impulse to develop this recipe began with  a podcast I heard on which Adam Schiff noted that while vegan burgers have become much more widely available, the vegan bun remains an elusive desideratum.

I can think about a few possible reasons for this.  Two conflicting qualities make a sandwich bun optimal.  The ideal sandwich delivery system is sufficiently soft and fluffy that it does not interfere with or distract from the sandwich contents, but strong enough to contain any juices without disintegrating.  A dough with eggs and milk or milk powder can provide a fine dense crumb to fill these requirements, but adding mashed potatoes to the dough can do the same thing.  This recipe is inspired by the potato bread in The Greens Cookbook by Deborah Madison.  I added some sweet potato just for some golden eggy color, but serendipitously, the sweet potato dough turned out softer and fluffier than any other batch.  This is also a recipe which works best with all-purpose flour.


Vegan Buns

1 medium-large russet potato, about 6-7 ounces
2 ounces sweet potato

2 pounds all-purpose flour (about 7-8 cups)

1 cup water (use water from cooking the potatoes, plus enough added to make one cup)
1 cup unsweetened soy milk
1 1/2 packets yeast (1 tablespoon, 3/8 ounce)

3 tablespoons sunflower oil
2 tablespoons date syrup, malt, or sugar
1 tablespoon salt

1/2 cup water
1 teaspoon cornstarch
sesame seeds
Coarse grain sea salt (optional)

Peel the potatoes and cut into 1-inch dice.  Put them in a small saucepan and add water to cover and 3/4 teaspoons salt.  Bring to the boil and simmer until quite tender. Strain and reserve the water.

Measure reserved potato water and if necessary, add enough water to make one cup.  If the water has become cool, reheat it.  Combine the water and soy milk in a mixing bowl.  The mixture should be warm.  Sprinkle yeast over the surface and add half the flour.  Mix with the paddle.  Leave the spongy dough in the mixing bowl to rise for 45 minutes.

Mix the dough once more with the paddle.  Remove the paddle and add the potatoes, syrup, oil,  salt, and remaining flour.  Knead with the dough hook for four or five minutes.  This dough can also be kneaded by hand.  The dough will be somewhat softer and stickier than typical bread dough, but worry not.

Turn the dough into an oiled bowl and allow to rise for another 45 minutes.  Punch it down, separate challah, and divide the remaining dough into twenty pieces for large buns or 40 for slider buns. Roll the dough bits into round balls and arrange them on parchment-lined sheet pans.  Press each roll to flatten into bun shapes.  Cover and and allow to rise another 45 minutes.

Heat the oven to 350F (Mark 4)

Bring 1/2 cup water to the boil.  In a small cup or bowl, dissolve 1 teaspoon cornstarch in 1 teaspoon cold water.  Add the cornstarch slurry to the boiling water and cook until clear.  Brush the tops of the risen buns with cornstarch, and sprinkle with sesame seeds and coarse salt. Bake the buns for 25 minutes, rotating the pans after 15 minutes.

ETA: Use this dough to make vegan Challah!

Weave your vegan challah dough to make a crown, a challahsaurus, challah turtles, or just these beauties.

 

 

 



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Sunday, October 13, 2019

Star Thistle Honey Cake with Michigan Sour Cherries





Honey cakes I usually make are dark, dense, winey, slightly bitter, and full of a mixed chorus of seasonings.  This cake may look a little pale compared with some of the other honey cakes you have seen here, but the flavors are just as bright and vivid.  We are very proud of star thistle honey here in Michigan.  It has bright, zingy, almost citrusy notes on top, with a nice warm sweetness underneath.  We are also proud of our sour cherries, but not quite proud enough to call them sour cherries.

Star Thistle Honey Cake with Michigan Sour Cherries

1 cup dried Michigan sour cherries
Ann Arbor Autumn Gin (or brandy, or just tea)

3 cups flour (2 cups all purpose and 1 cup whole wheat pastry or a mix of gluten-free flours)
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup sugar

4 eggs
3/4 cup sunflower oil, or other oil
1 cup star thistle honey
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/4 cup chopped candied orange peel

Heat the oven to 425.
Prepare two cake pans

Soak the cherries overnight in enough gin to cover.

Stir together the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl.

Beat the eggs and blend in the oil, honey, and extract.  Add the cherries and orange peel.  Pour the liquid ingredients into the flour mixture and fold until just combined.  Pour the batter into the cake pans and bake for 25 minutes.  Lower the heat to 350 after the first five minutes.

ETA:
I just made a gluten-free version of this recipe using two cups of a gluten-free mix and a half cup each oat flour and white rice flour.  For the gluten-free version bake the batter in four pans rather than two, and increase the baking time by about 20 minutes.

Sunday, September 29, 2019

Paw Paws are a Thing דער פּאָפּאָבוים





Counter clockwise from bottom:  Paw paws, ground cherries, Michigan honey, apples and pears from Centennial Community Farm, pomegranates.


One of the mystifying songs we had to sing in grade school was "Way Down Yonder in the Paw Paw Patch."  I liked this song well enough, but it never occurred to me that paw paws were a real kind of fruit.  I thought that like wizards, dragons, flying carpets, and Kalamazoo, they were just made up for children's literature.  Last month I took a train through Kalamazoo, and this month I learned that paw paws are in fact a thing.  I can't wait to see what month  brings.

On the inside they look a little like orange cherimoyas, with soft, creamy pulp and smooth hard seeds.  The fragrance is lush and tropical with notes of mango, papaya, banana, and lichee.  It is hard to believe they are native to this cool temperate area.  I will have to wait until after the holiday to tell you how they taste.

Also photographed above are ground cherries, which you may have encountered in the Little House books and My Antonia.

For tonight  am planning to make a cake with Michigan star thistle honey and Michigan sour cherries, and maybe even a sour cherry tsimes.  We are very proud of our cherries here in Michigan, but not proud enough to call them sour cherries.  Locals insist on calling them "tart cherries."  That makes me sad.  Sour cherries and not lesser cherries. Own your cherries, Michigan!

Other honey cakes:

Date Honey Cake
Pomegranate Honey Cake
Chocolate Honey Cake
Classic Honey Cake

דער פּאָפּאָבוים
Der popoboym, the paw paw tree

דער פּאָפּאָ
der popo, the paw paw

דאָס כינעזישע לאַמטערל
Dos Khinezishe lamterl, the ground cherry
Here are the Seegers singing Paw Paw Patch:


And one more film from Nature Boy Crabmeat 

Make pudding.

And of course, Honey Pie!













Have a sweet and beautiful year.


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